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New York Fashion Week announces schedule changes for spring/summer 2018 shows

Models present creations from Michael Kors Spring/Summer 2014 collection during New York Fashion Week, September 11, 2013 Reuters pic
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The various changes currently shaking up the ready-to-wear fashion world are impacting the schedules of the industry’s fashion week events.

New York is the latest fashion week to announce a modified schedule, cut from eight to seven days for the spring/summer 2018 shows, held in September.

The Council of Fashion Designers of America has announced a shorter schedule for the upcoming New York Fashion Week, taking place this fall.

The CFDA explains in a statement that the decision aims “to improve the overall New York Fashion Week experience and better serve attendees.”

Next season’s NYFW, showcasing spring/summer 2018 collections, runs September 7 to 13 — a total of seven days rather than the usual eight.

Although the full schedule is yet to be confirmed, the CFDA has announced Calvin Klein and Tom Ford for the opening day, September 7, at 10am and 7pm respectively.

Marc Jacobs is lined up to close the event with a show September 13 at 6pm

The CFDA’s revised schedule comes in response to the many changes rumbling on in ready-to-wear fashion for several seasons, with show cancellations, labels moving from one fashion capital to another, and a growing number of mixed collections.Read more at:backless formal dresses

Tackling body diversity in virtual retail world

Real-size models, Melissa Barnard, Emma Dye, Liz Parnov with Kate Hedges.
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E-commerce entrepreneur Kate Hedges firmly believes that when it comes to online shopping, one size does not fit all.

Frustrated by the lack of body diversity in the virtual retail world, the Subiaco style maven has taken matters into her own hands by launching an e-store that challenges the way clothes are displayed.

Rather than using a sample-sized model, Fashion Backroom instead uses three real women representing small, medium and large so customers can see the garments on bodies more similar to their own.

“Often I would go on websites and see a very skinny, ridiculously tall, beautiful girl, but she wasn’t representing normal-sized women,” Hedges told AAA.

“The main focus was supporting positive body image. I am trying to get girls to see that there isn’t one-size-fits-all anymore.”

Since leaving her lucrative advertising job and pouring her life savings into starting the business six months ago, Hedges has received orders from around the world and the feedback from shoppers has been overwhelming.

She is now taking her message of body diversity wider as a finalist in the Miss West Coast pageant, with the 23-year-old determined to inspire others to feel more comfortable in their own skin.

“Something that really resonated for me was to own your differences and your flaws,” Hedges said.

“I am a redhead so I straight-away stand out, and in years gone by I hated it. But I have grown into it now and love it, and people can see that.

“You have to work with what you’ve got, there’s no point comparing yourself to anyone else.”

Hedges hopes to eventually open a brick-and-mortar Fashion Backroom store and has visions of taking her online offering even further.

“I would like to have an artificial model where you can put in your measurements and the clothes would change for that body type,” she said.Read more at:formal dresses canberra

I Started A Business To Prove People Wrong

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In June this year, I’ll celebrate 10 years in business as a photographer, a decade of self-employment and running a successful business. A business I set up not to make a profit but just to prove that I wasn’t a write-off.

You see, I have bipolar and I’d been told by “caring” individuals that I should face facts, that I would always be mental and living on disability living allowance. I’m grateful that I had those years where I could claim DLA, I was agoraphobic and wouldn’t go past my own back gate on my own but I knew that the benefits system was ultimately there to help in a time of need and that I wasn’t someone who would take advantage of that.

Whilst I’d been agoraphobic I’d also taken the time to teach myself photography as well as starting a blog where I wrote about my daily life in the hopes that one day it would help other people.

Mandy Charlton Photography was set up on the 22nd June 2007 and soon after work started to land in my inbox, my first wedding came just a few weeks later, an arranged Sikh wedding, I wasn’t told it was an arranged marriage and I certainly wasn’t ready for the fact that the bride cried for the whole of the first day! At the reception of 750 lovely Asians and me, I stood against a wall in a moment of panic, it was the hottest day of the year in a cramped space and I could feel myself not being able to breathe properly, just for a few seconds it crossed my mind that I should get out now, go home and never come out of the house again and then something happened. Call it implosion flooding therapy if you want, suddenly I was calm and I knew that whatever challenges I faced I could do this, I could get through anything because I was stronger than anyone had given me credit for.

At the end of the first year, I made the smallest profit but it didn’t matter because I knew that for every day I was in business I was proving the world wrong, I was proving that you can do anything as long as you do it on your own terms.

I’m an active advocate now for people living with complex mental health issues, I talk to many people who are stuck in the same position I found myself in and I tell them they can be anything they want to be as long as they too, do it on their own terms.

Ten years in and life and work still throws up many challenges - single parenting, running a business, it’s all a perpetual juggling act and I’m adult enough to admit that sometimes I drop the ball. But mostly I have a life I love now, I get the freedom I need to manage my mental health condition and I take less medication than ever before. In business I am a success, well I am to me and to my children and really they’re all that matters.

So the next time someone tells you that you can’t do something, prove them wrong because you can do anything!Read more at:formal dress shops brisbane

Social media gives models power

The British model has been a prominent figure in the fashion industry since the ‘90s, working for the likes of Marc Jacobs, Chanel and Alexander McQueen, on top of landing countless magazine covers.

When it comes to breaking out into the business nowadays a lot of aspiring models rely on the Internet to help boost their name and image, which while Karen can see the appeal, she can’t relate to it.

“It’s about the young Instagram girl now, and that’s not me at all,” she shrugged to Porter magazine. “I don’t disrespect the girls who have made it their forte. In fact, they’ve allowed models to have some form of power and so I have a lot of respect for that.”

Karen, 38, isn’t just focused on fashion though; she insists posing is simply a day job to help pay her mortgage, and her real passion lies in making music. She recently unveiled her second album, Double Roses, seven years after releasing her debut The Ghost Who Walks with help from her ex-husband Jack White.

But that’s not to say the flame-haired beauty hasn’t taken anything from being a famous model, as she explained: “Fashion did set me up in the most beautiful of ways for what music could throw at me, because in fashion you deal with rejection on a daily basis.”

She also noted how much she loves working with photographers, with Bruce Weber and Steven Meisel just two of the famous lensmen she’s been shot by. She puts her longevity in fashion down to her ability to “lock into” the right mindset for the job as well as learning how to give out what’s required of her.Read more at:http://www.marieaustralia.com/formal-dresses-perth | http://www.marieaustralia.com/formal-dresses-canberra

'Why can't I be a feminist sex symbol?'

Emily ratajkowski
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Emily Ratajkowski is determined to fight back against people stereotyping her as an empty-headed sex symbol.

The 25-year-old model first shot to fame in Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines video and has since landed roles in movies including Gone Girl and We Are Your Friends.

She is also known for sharing sexy images on her social media pages, but said in a new interview with Marie Claire magazine that just because she is proud of her sexuality, doesn’t mean she can’t also be a women’s rights advocate.

“In every profile written about me, there is, ‘She’s so sexual and she’s such a sex symbol,’ paired with, ‘But, wow, she knows about politics,’” she told the publication’s Fresh Faces issue. “And that in itself is sexist. Why does it have to be one or the other?”

Emily has two movies in post-production - In Darkness, in which she stars alongside Natalie Dormer and Joely Richardson and romance Cruise.

While her good looks see her offered a variety of film roles, Emily has become more picky about the projects she takes on.

These days, she is determined to take on parts that offer her more than just a chance to show off her stunning figure.

“I am way more interested in working with unexpected and cool directors on interesting projects than being in this big studio movie where you’re in a bikini,” she added. “I turn down a lot of movies, but I have to fight for the ones that I really want.”

Emily previously penned an essay for Glamour in which she insisted it’s wrong for women to be accused of seeking attention more often than men - regardless of whether it’s for speaking out on political issues, dressing a certain way or even for posting selfies.

“It’s absurd to think that desire for attention doesn’t drive both women and men,” she wrote in the essay. “Why are women scrutinized for it more, then? And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less ‘serious’? Our society doesn’t question men’s motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics - nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human.”Read more at:formal dresses online

My ego was hurt, says Vidya Balan

Vidya Balan
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Vidya Balan never shies away from playing strong roles and her upcoming film, Begum Jaan, appears to be no different. On the promotional trail of the film, the actress responds to queries with her trademark candour.

When asked if her ego was hurt at any point of time, Vidya replies, “During my early days in the film industry, I had gone to attend a funeral of someone from the industry. Since I reached early, the photographers started taking pictures and talking to me. After some time, Aamir Khan entered and immediately, they pushed me aside and started clicking his photos. It was then that my ego was hurt. However, when I reached home and shared this incident with my family members, I changed my thought process.”

The actress explains, “I realised that Aamir has done many good films and he is held in much higher esteem than I am. He is a well known star. The moment I realised this, I was perfectly normal.”Vidya says this incident changed her as a person.

“I am a changed person now. If I am hurt by anything — a question from the media or a comment on my fashion sense among other things, I just go ahead and discuss it with Siddharth (my husband) and my family members. Until I have spilled out every bit of a not-so-good experience, I am not content. I have learned to never feel depressed or hurt. Take it as it comes, and within your stride. This will keep you happy and smiling always,” she says.Read more at:long formal dresses

CMOA struts stuff with fashion exhibit

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Artist Iris van Herpen designs dresses that are so geometrically complex, they literally stand on their own — and her work has caught the eye of big name celebrities such as Lady Gaga and Beyonce.

Now, van Herpen’s fashion artwork has found a temporary home at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

CMOA’s “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” exhibition makes a statement in the realm of fashion, showcasing couture dresses with organic shapes and outlines. Van Herpen, 32, is the Dutch fashion designer behind the 15 eye-catching collections, most of which were inspired by some aspect of the world around her. Using unconventional materials and design mechanisms, such as 3-D printing, umbrella tines and lightbulb chains, van Herpen created the dresses and shoes in the exhibit with otherworldly appeal. The pieces on display appear to belong to a powerful queen, with geometrical-structured bodices, metallic tones and intricate details.

The CMOA is the exhibit’s third stop on its North American tour, after its previous stop at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The exhibit will remain at the CMOA until May 1.

According to Alice Lieb — who has been a docent at CMOA for six years — van Herpen’s first step in designing a dress is to ask the client if they will need to sit at all while wearing the dress. If they do, they might be out of luck — the rigid, hooped skirts and three-dimensional designs of some of van Herpen’s dresses make it impossible to sit without ruining the clothing.

Each collection in the exhibit portrays a different vision van Herpen had in mind, representing components of the the physical world or biological sciences, according to Rachel Delphia — the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman curator of decorative arts an.d design at CMOA.

Delphia said van Herpen stands out in the world of fashion and also in the world of art because of her success in a historically male-populated industry.

“Unfortunately, there still are not as many solo exhibitions about women as there are about men,” Delphia said. “So the opportunity to feature a women designer was really exciting.”

The very first collection that visitors see when they enter the exhibition is called Refinery Smoke. It is made of a metal mesh and fades from a metallic grey into a rusty tone, with the metal mesh widely surrounding the bodice of the dress in a skirt.

“Iris was drawn to, what she says, is ‘the duality of industrial smoke,’” Delphia said. “So the fact that it’s both beautiful and ethereal, we also know that it is toxic and dangerous — she was trying to create a line of garments that would evoke that.”

The exhibit’s stop in Pittsburgh is particularly fitting with this industrial theme. Pittsburgh and the surrounding region has an extremely complex relationship with industry — after seeing both the rise and fall of the steel industry — which has sparked inspiration among artists for centuries, according to Delphia.

“I think it is very fitting for Pittsburgh because of its art-science connection,” Delphia said. “That made it particularly interesting for this city and also for the Carnegie.”

Sarah Schleuning, the curator of decorative arts and design at the High Museum of Art, worked directly with van Herpen to shape the exhibit in Atlanta. Schleuning met with van Herpen, assisted her in selecting the works to be displayed, developed the content of the exhibition and wrote the labels and publications for the pieces.

Throughout her time with van Herpen, Schleuning was particularly struck by the artist’s use of nontraditional materials.

“You can really make anything out of anything,” Schleuning said. “If you can dream it, you can build it and you can make it.”

Schleuning said it was an unusual opportunity to work with an artist who is alive today, as she often works with pieces by artists who are no longer living. In this case, Schleuning was able to hear van Herpen’s input, better understand her ideas and produce what van Herpen envisioned for this exhibition — an intersection of science, industry and art.

“You have really incredible dialogues about how you see the work, how [the artist] see the work, and it’s really enjoyable.” Schleuning said.

According to Schleuning, the curators wanted to portray van Herpen as more of a scientist and experimenter in this exhibit, which is largely different from traditional fashion.

The process to get this idea across properly and to get the exhibit up and running for the local presentation at the CMOA took about 12 to 15 months, according to Delphia. This time was spent adapting the collection pieces to CMOA’s galleries, preparing educational materials and planning associative programing.

But, so far, the time investment has paid off. According to Media Relations Manager Jonathan Gaugler, the exhibit has been extremely popular thus far. Gaugler said there are about 1,000 visitors to the van Herpen exhibit per day — although he also said the average number of visitors varies widely for each individual exhibit.

“That’s big,” Gaugler said in an email. “When you consider just how huge and complex our museum is and how much there is to see and do here.”

CMOA does not have a textiles and fashion department, so the exhibit is the first of its kind at the CMOA, according to Delphia.

“This exhibition is about much more than just gazing at beautiful ball gowns — not that there’s anything wrong with that,” Delphia said. “But I loved thinking about her creative process. She has an incredible, inquisitive mind.”

“[Her inspiration may] be primary forces like magnetism and radiation,” Delphia said. “[Or] the idea of human-machine hybrids or what microorganisms look like through an electron microscope.”Read more at:mermaid formal dresses

Spring into Trendy with New Fashions

Spring into Trendy with New Fashions

With spring hiding just around the corner, everyone is itching to get out of their winter coats and wool sweaters.

Shorts and sundresses are starting to pop up on clothing store racks and in the pages of fashion magazines, and the wait to try out new trends is almost over.

Starting this spring, everything is denim.

Gone are the days of limiting an outfit to one or two classic blue pieces. Instead, spring is bringing denim on denim on denim. Overalls, chambray shirts, jean jackets and jean skirts are guaranteed matches no matter the shade. All denim goes together.

Though denim is perfectly comfortable in its own company, some pieces stand out.

Distressed jeans are cropping up, sporting rips, fraying and substantial holes that give an airy feel after a long winter while also reinstating the perfect grunge piece to any wardrobe.

After all, 90s grunge is back, though perhaps with a bit more sparkle.

Another trend hitting the streets are pins and patches.

Those 90s jean jackets, overalls and backpacks are sporting enamel pins and sew-on patches that add a pop of brightness and personality. Even rhinestones are showing up to glam up simple pieces.

While being trendy, decals are a simple way to add bling to previous seasons’ pieces.

It’s not only spring’s accessories that are getting bold. The season’s fashions are also incorporating what the New York Times termed “punk but ladylike.”

Motorcycle jackets are adding boldness to even the most sophisticated ensembles while the pairing of blazers with a graphic tee is a relaxed way to add some edge to a casual outfit.

Because not everyone is out to relive their “Bad Reputation” days, spring is also bringing a softer wave of trends.

Airy dresses, floral prints and muted colors of Bohemian styles are again cropping up.

This season’s take on boho-chic incorporates the standby characteristics with season-specific trends like crocheted tops and ruffles.

As much as fashion changes the clothing styles of each season, so do beauty trends.

Spring makeup reflects the flavor of apparel through its effortlessness.

The essence of this year’s spring makeup trends is minimalism.

Instead of donning heavy eyeshadow and deep rouges, light makeup lets healthy skin shine on its own, accented by a touch of mascara or an effortless winged eyeliner.

As with clothing, makeup isn’t without its statement pieces. A pop of color might just be what is needed to enhance a casual look. A swoosh of bold lip color or a choice of bright nail polish create a dynamic addition.

Cosmopolitan’s May issue provides a quick guide to what shades do the trick for any style, from boho to grunge.

Red wine, champagne and rose can be dressed down into soft tones or vamped up to make a statement.

Getting with spring’s fashion trends will be as effortless as the emerging styles themselves. The freedom and familiarity of revival and standby fashion is easy to embrace while creating new spinoffs which welcome the warm weather to come.Read more at:cheap formal dresses | red formal dresses

King City student wins York Region fashion design challenge

Brianna Wilkins has always been extremely creative. The Grade 11 student at King City Secondary School (KCSS) likes to make things in her free time. Her oma taught her how to sew when she was younger and she has put those skills to use making a dress romper and different types of shirts. “I tend to fix things,” she said.

Wilkins put her talent to work earlier this month at the York Region District School Board Skills Challenge. Students from across York Region high came out to compete against fellow students in one of 25 skills-based contests.

She not only competed in the fashion design category, but came home with the gold medal. “It was fun,” Wilkins said of the experience.

Wilkins, who takes the fashion design course at KCSS, said the competition was a little bit nerve-racking because there was a four-hour time limit. That time pressure isn’t normal so it was a bit of challenge, she said. Each contestant was sent a dress pattern that they cut out in school and brought to the event. They had to display their skills through a fashion drawing and the creation of a garment sewn from a pattern.

In Wilkins’ case, she made a black dress and added a collar and trim. She also added a personal touch with necklace made out of safety pins and beads.

On the second floor of the high school, the dress is displayed in the hallway in between rows of lockers. While Wilkins knows she has talent in design, she said it’s more of her hobby. “It’s a backup plan if my sciences don’t work out,” she said.

The gold medal winners of most competitions, including fashion design, advance to compete provincially at the Skills Ontario Competition to be held at the Toronto Congress Centre on May 1-3, 2017.

Unfortunately Wilkins said she won’t be able to make it to that competition.

Other categories that were part of the YRDSB Skills Challenge included 2D animation, 3D animation, architectural technology and design, carpentry, graphic design — presentation, graphic design — studio production, hairstyling, job interviewing, photography, prepared speech and robotics.Read more at:princess formal dresses | one shoulder formal dresses

King City student wins York Region fashion design challenge

Brianna Wilkins has always been extremely creative. The Grade 11 student at King City Secondary School (KCSS) likes to make things in her free time. Her oma taught her how to sew when she was younger and she has put those skills to use making a dress romper and different types of shirts. “I tend to fix things,” she said.

Wilkins put her talent to work earlier this month at the York Region District School Board Skills Challenge. Students from across York Region high came out to compete against fellow students in one of 25 skills-based contests.

She not only competed in the fashion design category, but came home with the gold medal. “It was fun,” Wilkins said of the experience.

Wilkins, who takes the fashion design course at KCSS, said the competition was a little bit nerve-racking because there was a four-hour time limit. That time pressure isn’t normal so it was a bit of challenge, she said. Each contestant was sent a dress pattern that they cut out in school and brought to the event. They had to display their skills through a fashion drawing and the creation of a garment sewn from a pattern.

In Wilkins’ case, she made a black dress and added a collar and trim. She also added a personal touch with necklace made out of safety pins and beads.

On the second floor of the high school, the dress is displayed in the hallway in between rows of lockers. While Wilkins knows she has talent in design, she said it’s more of her hobby. “It’s a backup plan if my sciences don’t work out,” she said.

The gold medal winners of most competitions, including fashion design, advance to compete provincially at the Skills Ontario Competition to be held at the Toronto Congress Centre on May 1-3, 2017.

Unfortunately Wilkins said she won’t be able to make it to that competition.

Other categories that were part of the YRDSB Skills Challenge included 2D animation, 3D animation, architectural technology and design, carpentry, graphic design — presentation, graphic design — studio production, hairstyling, job interviewing, photography, prepared speech and robotics.Read more at:princess formal dresses | one shoulder formal dresses

Marymount University’s Annual Runway Fashion Show Returns

photo of marymount gown
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Marymount University’s student-run fashion show is back. “Portfolio in Motion” promises to lose you in REVERIE, a dream that has come to life. Students of Marymount University’s fashion program have come together to create the grandest university event of the year on April 27, 2017.

Portfolio in Motion invites both alumni and Washingtonians to enjoy a tradition that stems over 27 years. The annual runway show is the culmination of a full academic year of hands-on learning for upcoming fashion graduates that is reflective of the incomparable nature of Marymount’s fashion program.

Students and faculty are honored to award New York City-based, American fashion designer Lela Rose, Designer of the Year for 2017. An honor that has been awarded to distinguished designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Carolina Herrera, Ralph Rucci, Reem Acra and many more.

Lela Rose

This year’s award recipient has a special place in the hearts of Marymount students. During an exclusive fashion workshop hosted by Former First Lady Michelle Obama, selected students had the privilege of being taught by Lela Rose. During the workshop, they recognized her as a role model and successfully talented designer who demonstrates all the qualities of being Designer of The Year.

Widely regarded for her elegant aesthetic and fresh point of view, Lela Rose continues to redefine a sophisticated, yet modern lifestyle with her expanded, designer ready-to-wear-offerings. Formally trained as a painter and sculptor prior to pursuing fashion design, Rose employs a brilliant use of color, rich fabrications, sculptural silhouettes and handcrafted details. Her artistic background is evident in her work and adds unexpected dimension and breadth to each season’s collection.

Rose’s unique point of view and the quality of her designs and fabrications have elevated the esteem of the brand, receiving recognition from fashion editors, stylists and high-profile celebrities who are regularly seen wearing the brand – including Gwyneth Paltrow, Jessica Chastain, Claire Danes, Anne Hathaway, Selena Gomez, Zoe Saldana, Uma Thurman, Olivia Munn, Sofia Vergara, Karolina Kurkova, Chrissy Teigen, January Jones, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and First Lady Michelle Obama, among others.Read more at:formal dress shops

Fashion’s Most Powerful Models Signed This Photography Book

Writer Christopher Niquet started collecting models’ autographs after running into Peggy Moffitt at a party in L.A. one night. He was working with Karl Lagerfeld as a stylist at the time, and he never asked for autographs. But when he saw Moffitt, he couldn’t help it. Niquet has now spent years collecting signed photographs from the fashion industry’s most influential models, including Cindy Crawford, China Machado, and Pat Cleveland. His new book Models Matter, out April 25 from Damiani, showcases the collection and features an introduction by photographer Steven Meisel.

The tome juxtaposes the photos with stories from fashion insiders, who each explain why a certain image resonates with them. For one photo of Alek Wek, Niquet turned to Lupita Nyong’o. “I asked her because I knew she’d done a speech around the time of her Oscar win, where she talked about how seeing the face of Alek Wek in magazines as a teenager really helped her accept her type of blackness, which really wasn’t represented at the time,” he said. Others share memories alongside photos of Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, and Jean Shrimpton.

Niquet said it was important to have the book showcase not just easily recognizable models like Twiggy and Cindy Crawford, but to also feature lesser-known models who left their own mark on the industry. He likened this to times when he worked as stylist and looked to models’ faces on billboards for inspiration, rarely being able to identify exactly who the model was. “If we don’t tell their stories, no one is going to know about them.” Click ahead to see shots and autographs of Pat Cleveland, China Machado, Alek Wek, Peggy Moffitt, Stella Tennant, and others.Read more at:red formal dresses | one shoulder formal dresses

What it’s like interning for Vogue

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Strutting down campus in high heels and a perfectly tailored, eccentric outfit, even in the mites of rain, sleet and snow, Lalisa Wongchai is always a sight to behold. Anyone can see that she clearly has the ‘Vogue’ look, so it’s not shocking to learn that she has already made a name for herself at the cutthroat and dazzling world of Vogue.

Wongchai is the assistant/intern to the editor of Vogue Thailand. She is truly a jack-of-all-trades as she works in journalism, public relations, showroom and model agency bookings for her boss.

This has been a dream come true for Wongchai, who has been interested in fashion most of her life.

Over spring break, she accompanied her boss on a business trip to Paris, France for Paris Fashion Week to help organize and assist in a Vogue dinner party for up and coming Thai designer, Angley Balek.

She first fell in love with the city while participating in the Discover France program in the spring of 2016 through St. John’s.

“I like to live a full life of aesthetics and there’s something about Paris that fits me so well. It is an elegant city full of art and rich history,” Wongchai said.

Though she was happy to be back in Paris, she had no time to lollygag since she played a critical role in organizing the events. She was in charge of managing the guest list and inviting celebrities, models and key figures in the fashion industry to the event.

She worked closely with Elite and Women Management modeling agencies and was able to get A-listers like Sara Sampaio (Victoria’s Secret Angel), Sonia Ben (face of Dolce & Gabbana), Jazmine Sanders (Instagram “it girl’) and many of the Bulgari girls to attend the event.

Backstage she worked to help some of the major attendees get fitted to wear the designer’s clothes for the dinner.

“One of the people I got to fit was rapper Azealia Banks,” Wongchai said.

When she wasn’t running around trying not to break her ankle in her signature heels while live reporting the dinner party on Vogue Thailand’s Instagram at #voguexangellys, she was mingling with elites in the fashion industry, including several Vogue editor-in-chiefs from around the world and celebrities like Kat Graham and Jackie Cruz.

“It honestly felt like I was living in a dream. To be able to taste this different world… I never thought I would be able to experience it, at least at this age,” she said.

“I had so much fun, but it was hectic at times especially getting back the sample clothes from the guests attending it was challenging because during fashion week response time is extremely slow and I only had a few days to get the clothes back before rushing back to NYC for class,” Wongchai said.

She clearly works hard and she said she owes much of her success to her boss who also works to mentor her.

“My career thus far, I owe it to my boss, she has inspired me and took far beyond my boundaries,” she said.

As anyone trying to break into the fashion industry would know, it is rough trying to get a foot in the door, but Wongchai said she would advise people not to give up on their dreams and keep working to make those key connections.

“Keep putting yourself out there. No matter how many times you feel like giving up, don’t let anyone stop you from dreaming,” she said.Read more at:celebrity dresses

St Peter's Hospice summer fashion campaign aiming to 'challenge preconceptions of charity shopping'

St Peter's Hospice summer fashion campaign aiming to 'challenge preconceptions of charity shopping'
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All 50 St Peter’s Hospice shops across South Gloucestershire and Bristol will be stocking florals and frills to metallics and denim as the latest trends hit the shelves, with some top brands, including the likes of Karen Millen, French Connection and Paul Smith, on sale for half their original price.

The hospice has said that it hopes the campaign could challenge the preconceptions of charity shopping.

Paul Chivers, head of retail at St Peter’s Hospice, said: “Our shops are a brilliant hunting ground for high-quality fashion that people can afford to try out. We’ve got some really bold, daring and quirky items as well as your average high street fashions for men, women and children.

“In recent years pre-loved fashion has really taken off with online sites like Ebay and Depop becoming popular. The great thing with our shops is that you can try before you buy and the money you spend goes straight back into helping people in need in Bristol.

“We are doing lots more upcycling and repurposing of our clothes to give them a vintage or an edgy feel and that’s working really well. Many shops now have a dedicated vintage section and our City Centre store has just launched its own Urban Fashion section.”

Mr Chivers added: “All money generated from our shops and clearance stores goes directly towards caring for patients with life-limiting illnesses as well as supporting their families, both at the hospice and out in the community.

“As ever, our fantastic stock is thanks to our donators, so if you’re clearing space in your wardrobe to make way for new summer outfits please drop your unwanted items to your local St Peter’s Hospice shop.”Read more at:one shoulder formal dresses

This fashion exhibition will showcase the collections of a designer duo from Paris

Veteran designers Didier Lecoanet and Hemant Sagar of label Lecoanet Hemant - known for their glamourous take on textile and structure - will host an exhibition at Bikaner House, Pandara Road, next week to showcase their past collections from Paris as well as the new range from their Gurugram Atelier.

Titled 'Inside the world of Lecoanet Hemant', the exhibit will feature nearly 80 garments - created between 1984 to 2000 from Paris workshop, and from 2000 to 2017 in Gurugram. On display will be a range of designs and techniques that move from artisanal to semi-Industrial, merging ancestral Haute Couture craft practices with contemporary industrial products.

Speaking with Lifestyle, Hemant Sagar shares, "To be honest, in India I find the artisans are in the past tense. My question is why do collections go back so much in tradition - why are they not more modern? There isn't much research and development in material, which is why new design doesn't have 'matter' to work with."

He continues, "So then people ask me 'if you're so good, show me what you can do'? With this exhibition I would like to show how we were developing in the past and how high artisanal techniques can be transformed to semi-industrial material and design."

Garments on display will include handmade pieces as well as machine made series, but as he emphasises, "there is nothing cheap or industrial about it"

For fashion designers who are keen to learn the craft, Sagar says that nearly every garment has a different technique, a lot of research, and the use of various technology. "It's been a long travel of research and aesthetic. We learnt the techniques of traditional Indian wear -which is about draping and weaving, and those of western wear - which is about cutting and sewing. It is only then that a fusion could be possible in the true sense."

'Inside the world of Lecoanet Hemant' will be exhibited at Bikaner House from March 19-22, between 11 am and 6.30 pm. The designer will give guided tours on March 20 and 21 in the afternoon.Read more at:long evening dresses | formal dresses 2017